Entrée masiakasaurus (masiaka, sauros)
Partie du discours nom
Explications en anglais Masiakasaurus knopfleri (mah-SHEE-kah-sawr-us nawp-FLAIR-ee) "Vicious Lizard" (Masiaka = "vicious" + sauros = lizard)

This new dinosaur was discovered on the island of Madagascar, dating back to the late Cretaceous period 65 million to 70 million years ago. Scientists named it after the guitarist and songwriter from Dire Straits, Mark Knopfler, because they listened to the group's music while digging.

The dinosaur was probably 5 to 6 feet long, most of it neck and tail, and it probably weighed about 80 pounds. It was probably as fast as a dog but ran on its hind legs like other meat-eating dinosaurs.
The teeth are the Strangest of any dinosaur - In the front, they are long and conical with hooked tips and they protrude straight forward, so it might be easier to catch fish, but it might be used to spear insects or some other animal.
The bones of the small dinosaur were about the size of a German shepherd. They were discovered by researchers led by the University of Utah, paleontologist "Scott Sampson".
The dinosaur, named Masiakasaurus knopfleri appears to be related to other fossils in Argentina and India, suggesting Madagascar was connected to the "supercontinent" of Gondwana for longer than believed.
There is evidence its diet covered a broad range of prey, including fish, insects, lizards, snakes and ancient mammals, which were no bigger than a shrew, he said.
"The most important aspect of this animal is that it underscores the fact that, contrary to popular opinion, we still don't know everything about dinosaurs.

[http://www.geocities.com/anthrosaurs/Masiakasaurus.html]
 [2001/01/27] ... [Science News ]
 [2001/02/01] While digging for dinosaurs bones in Madagascar, a team led by Scott Sampson of the University of Utah ... unveiled the results ...: a two-legged predator about six feet long and three feet tall that weighted about 80 pounds. It had front teeth that pointed nearly straight out of its jaw. [Discover ]
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Mis à jour le 2020/07/31